Olympic Stadium: Disrupting The Leyton Orient Community

West Ham and Tottenham Hostpur are both vying for rights to take over the Olympic Stadium in Stratford, in a bid to preserve a lasting legacy for the games.

But, the movement of either club to East London would not only rip them from their heartlands, but also threaten the existence of London’s second oldest football club, Leyton Orient.

The club this morning released an empassioned statement calling for neither club to move to a venue that is around a mile from Brisbane Road.

Orient are a club whose voice has not been heard throughout this shambolic affair, deemed, probably, not large or wealthy enough to grace the corridors of power with their influence. The shifting of a large club on to the door step of a smaller one, may indeed lead to their extinction, and with it, an effervescent community club that treasures the people who live and breathe it.

I have experienced this first hand. For the last couple of years the Dale Jacobs Trophy has taken place close-season – a match that takes places at Brisbane Road in memory of an Orient fan who sadly lost his life to cancer.

The club allows use of the pitch and corporate facilities with a game between the supporters’ trust and fans the highlight of the day, often featuring ex-pros, kind enough to give up their time to get involved.

The club make little money from this, but give a little something back to their community with this gesture.

If this happens at larger clubs, i’m certainly not aware of it.

To disrupt a community like this is socially wreckless. That the government is complicit in the decision over who should take over the stadium after 2012, with their ‘big society’ posturing, is a damning indictment that shows no change: money still talks, no matter what the cause.

I am not a Leyton Orient fan, the better half is and alerted me to this morning’s statement, but I can see, especially given the MK Dons debacle, how reliant a community can be on it’s football club.

Leyton Orient already have a small catchment area in which to try and gain support, do not let that become even smaller by moving one of the giants of English football just around the corner.

In time, I guess we will find out if English football has a conscience, or if it’s just a game of pound signs and egos.

Update: John Beech has a rules and regualationa perspective on his blog, via @kevinrye.

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8 thoughts on “Olympic Stadium: Disrupting The Leyton Orient Community

  1. Pingback: Olympic Stadium To Wreck Football In The Community: Leyton Orient « Fan 6927

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  3. Pingback: Leyton Orient And The Loss Of Community « Fan6927 – A Watford FC Blog

  4. Spot on mate. Great little club are the Orient, I guess West Ham are local but Spurs looking to move there is nothing short of outrageous. I can’t see that anyone other than the respective boards really want their club moving to the Olympic stadium…. As an aside, weren’t Orient being mooted as possible residents early in the process?

  5. Cheers for the comment Tom, appreciate it!

    As far as i’m aware Orient were not keen on moving to the stadium themselves because Barry Hearn wasn’t keen on the idea of keeping the running track: http://www.morethanthegames.co.uk/football/019574-leyton-orient-chairman-hearn-brands-olympic-stadium-untenable

    I imagine he’s also got concerns with filling a 30,000 seater stadium when the average gate is around 4,000, as well as having money invested into Brisbane Road!

  6. As a lifelong O’s fan, I’m saddened that the media only seem to highlight the battle between the Premier big guns, regardless of the fact Brisbane Road is within a long goal kick of the Olympic Stadium.

    Leyton Orient are a small, friendly club that have one of the best community out-reach programmes of all 92 professional clubs but that all goes out the window when it’s about the filthy green lucre . . .

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