Digital Campaign Foundations

I recently gave a talk at NationBuilder’s ‘Ingredients of a Successful Digital Campaign’ event. The focus of the 7 minute (!) presentation was the role of the consultant in developing a digital strategy.

I thought i’d share the full text to add context to the points I talked through at the event. As ever, thanks to Toni and the NationBuilder team for having me!

Digital Integration
Regardless of your sector, online and offline communications go hand in hand; they are totally integrated.

Previously, people would talk about your brand down the pub and you’d never get a true insight into how you were perceived without looking at expensive market research. Now, people go on Twitter, Facebook, Vine, Periscope etc and you can find out in an instant what they think of you.

Digital campaigns give us a great opportunity to connect with audiences in ways only made possible in the last 10-15 years – the caveat being that in order to connect effectively you need to work around your audience.

I’ll keep coming back to audiences because they are more vocal than ever; you’ll get feedback you like, feedback that you don’t. What you can be certain of, is that they’ll let you know what they think.

What Is Strategy?
Before we get to the strategy development, I think it’s worth spending a moment to outline what a strategy actually is. Digital comms is a blend of art and science, so let’s do the science bit first by setting a control for the discussion.

Strategy one of the most mis-used words in a marketer’s vocabulary – I’m as guilty of it as anyone else – so let’s set a common understanding:

Aim – the overall desired outcome we want to achieve
Strategy – how we’re going to go about what we want to achieve
Objectives – what needs to happen contribute to us succeeding
Tactics – what we’re going to do to make it happen

So, a strategy outlines how we’re going to meet our imperative. Let’s see how that manifests itself.

Role of the Consultant
What does the consultant actually bring to the table?

Please forgive me for a selfie-related analogy… when it comes to strategy, I see the role of the consultant very much akin to the chap holding the phone taking a selfie with his family. Well, I assume it’s his family.

As a consultant you need to know what your end goal is – why are you doing what you’re doing; in the case of the selfie, it’s to get everybody in the same picture, preferably smiling, with a good amount of the background in shot so it’s Instagram-worthy.

You need to know who should be in the picture; preferably with as little opportunity for others to photobomb as possible.

You need to prepare everyone so that they know what their role is; in this case, smile on 3!

Finally, you need to have a steady arm; you need to ensure the end outcome (the picture) achieved what you set out to do in the first place.

A consultant’s role is to make sure that everyone has performed their roles to the best of their abilities to meet the needs of the client.

How do we get to find out what the client’s need are? The answer is actually pretty simple; we need to ask questions.

A client or prospect will come to us with a problem, issue or challenge they’re facing: we need to sell more product through our website; we have a corporate reputation issue on Twitter; we need to build our brand awareness with an online community.

We need to ask questions to help us understand what the client wants, what the community needs and then we can work out the bit in the middle: the strategy to bring the two together.

So, what are those questions? I’ve got 11 to get you started, but there are probably many more to throw in here. They broadly fall into 3 categories.

1. Set The Scene
We need to understand what the client wants to happen as a result of a digital campaign: We need to ask

1) What is the objective of your online presence & how does this tie into the overall business or communications objective? – This tells us the big picture, what should people expect from the client’s online presence?

2) How do we want people to think, act and feel when they see and interact with us online? – Are we looking to give them information to share; do we want to make them feel special; do we want them to associate us with a particular conversation topic?

You’ll notice this is no different to developing an offline strategy – the only aspect here is that the action is carried out online.

2. Define Your Audience
You need to know who you’re going to try and talk with, so there are four main questions to address:

3) Who are our audiences? – The answer here is not ‘Millennials’. Your answer should be based on interest groups; a cross section of Millennials may fall within an interest group, but Millennials as a whole, are not an audience.

4) Where are they online? – By understanding where your audience is online, you can work out how they behave and the best way to serve content. Are they in forums and looking for conversations; are they on Buzzfeed and looking for amazing content to share?

5) Where are we online; what are the gaps? – If we’re aiming to engage with people interested in fashion, do we have a credible YouTube or Instagram channel. If we’re looking to engage with people interested in politics, should we have a blog or a profile on Linkedin?

6) Where are our competitors online and what are they doing?/How do we stand out? – The Internet is saturated with brands, companies and organisations vying for attention – what can we provide to our desired target audiences that will make us stand out?

Again, you’ll notice this is no different to developing an offline strategy – the only aspect here is that the action is carried out online.

3. Refine Your Execution
Finally, how are we going to do what we need to do?

7) What are our key messages and stories? – We know what the desired audience is and how they behave, what do we want to tell them? If you don’t have an immediate news hook, you’ll not have any success!

8) How do we want to communicate them?/How should we communicate them? – Do we have loads of long form content ripe for reading? We need to compromise and turn those whitepapers into web-appropriate content; quick videos or infographics for example.

9) What does success look like? – We know what our aim is, what are we going to measure to ensure we’re successful. Are we looking for engagement, loyalty or sales?

10) How do we implement? – This is where we finally address what we need to do; are the right online channels already in place? Do we need to go and hire a photographer to take some amazing pictures? Do we have access to any talent to help connect our story with the audience?

11) What are we implementing? – Finally, the fun bit, and the aspect that we most naturally go to first: what tactics shall we use?

With all the information you’ve gathered with the first ten questions, you should be in a position to come up with amazingly creative, or simple yet effective campaign tactics that meet your needs and those of your target audience.

Again… it’s the same as creating an offline strategy, it’s just played out online.

Getting The Right Blend
Once you have your answers, you’ve got your plan in place and you’ve come up with a great campaign story, you need to work out how you’ll execute.

This is where you need to think about capabilities and resources. Do you have a team who can create amazing videos? Can you call on creatives who will bring your stories to life visually? Do you have people who can manage an influencer outreach programme? Do you have in-house resource to build a website or app?

As a consultant, either in-house or agency-side, you need to work out the best placed teams and people who can help you achieve the right result.

Working With Partners
That might mean that you’ll need to work with partners. There are lots of companies who can help you to put those foundations in place to help you succeed.

The key to working with partners is trust and building an honest and transparent working relationship.

Collaboration. Share as much knowledge as you can and collaborate to find the best solution to the challenge you’re facing.

The technology that is available to us to help run campaigns is astounding – we should embrace it and not be afraid to keep asking questions.

I’d love to know what i’ve missed and to get your thoughts on successful digital campaign strategy development, leave a comment below!

Social Media: Do Whatever You Please

Sally Whittle blogged today about the etiquette of connection in social media. She posed the question: Should social media be reciprocal?

It’s a question that’s difficult to answer initially. You follow someone on Twitter, Instagram or Pinterest (etc) because you enjoy the pictures, links or opinions they’re sharing and you hope they’ll take notice, see that you’re like-minded, and follow you back.

Saying that, when someone you do not know offline or online starts following you, your first instinct is to see who they are and to try and work out why they have made that connection. You then have to decide whether or not to follow them in return.

That process can be easy, or it can be tricky. If you follow them and enjoy what they’re posting over a long period of time, everyone’s a winner. If you choose not to follow them, they may not notice, or they might even unfollow.

*Worse case scenario klaxon*

You follow them for a while, decide, actually, this isn’t for you, and unfollow. They then unfollow you back immediately.

Nobody wants to be that person who loses a follower within a few tweets.

Then again, what does it matter? The question you should always be asking is: does following this person lead me to regular positive interaction?

If the answer is no, there should be no qualms about removing them from your digital life – there’s so much stuff going on online to keep up with, the last thing you need is clutter in your timeline.

You can always follow them back later if you change your mind.

Sometimes in real life, you need to be selfish and make decisions that benefit you in the long term as much as they
affect the people around you.

You should take that approach digitally too. I’m unfollowed, followed, and unfollowed all the time. I figure people dip in and out of what I’m sharing. That’s cool, it probably gets boring a lot of the time. If you were to read every tweet or post I published you’d get bored. Hell, I get bored.

But that’s the wonderful thing about social media, you can consume what you want, when you want, by whom you like, whenever you like.

And with that, I leave you with this:

PRS Begins Legal Action Against Soundcloud

The Performing Rights Society today distributed an email announcing legal action against Soundcloud.

I love Soundcloud. I think it provides a great service. It allows musicians to share their music and be part of a community who, spammers aside, listen to and share their tracks.

What it doesn’t do however, is pay musicians for streams of their tracks. Even though the likes of Spotify offer a pittance compared to a full CD or download, they are at least making an effort to remunerate musicians. Soundcloud do not.

I believe in free culture: art, music, literature etc should be free to anyone, anywhere and anytime.

The kicker here is that there is a proportion of musicians who pay for a premium Soundcloud profile – Soundcloud have an income stream. The musicians who Soundcloud make money from are not financially compensated for their work being hosted and played the platform.

The PRS support their members by ensuring that if their music is played, the member is compensated accordingly. It means many retailers pay into a license that then feeds back to the artist, for example.

Soundcloud does not have a PRS license, hence musicians not being paid.

As an independent musician who uses the PRS to ensure that I get some compensation for the many gigs I play for free (£5 per pub gig – or £5 for 30 minutes work), I support their action.

As someone who uses Soundcloud to promote my work, I hope they find an amicable agreement.

The email from the PRS is in full below:

Dear Member,

PRS for Music begins legal action against SoundCloud

After careful consideration, and following five years of unsuccessful negotiations, we now find ourselves in a situation where we have no alternative but to commence legal proceedings against the online music service SoundCloud.

When a writer or publisher becomes a member of the Performing Right Society, they assign certain rights to their works over for us to administer, so it’s our job to ensure we collect and distribute royalties due to them. SoundCloud actively promotes and shares music. Launched in 2008, the service now has more than 175m unique listeners per month. Unfortunately, the organisation continues to deny it needs a PRS for Music licence for its existing service available in the UK and Europe, meaning it is not remunerating our members when their music is streamed by the SoundCloud platform.

Our aim is always to license services when they use our members’ music. It has been a difficult decision to begin legal action against SoundCloud but one we firmly believe is in the best, long-term interests of our membership. This is because it is important we establish the principle that a licence is required when services make available music to users. We have asked SoundCloud numerous times to recognise their responsibilities to take a licence to stop the infringement of our members’ copyrights but so far our requests have not been met. Therefore we now have no choice but to pursue the issue through the courts.

We understand SoundCloud has taken down some of our members’ works from their service. With our letter of claim, we sent SoundCloud a list of 4,500 musical works which are being made available on the service, as a sample of our repertoire being used, so that they understood the scale of our members’ repertoire and its use on the service. We asked them to take a licence to cover the use of all our members’ repertoire or otherwise stop infringing.

SoundCloud decided to respond to our claim by informing us that it had removed 250 posts. Unfortunately, we have no visibility or clarity on SoundCloud’s approach to removing works, so it is not currently clear why these particular posts have been selected by them given the wider issue of infringement that is occurring. Ultimately, it is SoundCloud’s decision as to whether it starts paying for the ongoing use of our members’ music or stops using these works entirely.

If the streaming market is to reach its true potential and offer a fair return for our members, organisations such as SoundCloud must pay for their use of our members’ music. We launched our Streamfair campaign in June to raise awareness of this issue and highlight how music creators need to be properly remunerated from streaming. We believe that all digital services should obtain a licence which grants them permission to use our members’ music and repertoire, in this case the works of songwriters, publishers and composers.

The streaming market cannot fairly develop unless this happens. We have always been pro-licensing and pro-actively work with organisations in order to propose an appropriate licensing solution for the use of our members’ works.

We remain hopeful that this matter can be resolved without the need for extended litigation. Members will appreciate that this is now a legal matter and our ability to communicate around it is therefore limited by the legal process. However, we will try to share information and updates whenever we can.

Please visit our website to read our frequently asked questions.

Yours faithfully,

Karen Buse

Executive Director, Membership and International
PRS for Music

Russia Issues Selfie Guide

The Russian government has launched a guide to taking selfies, or more specifically, when NOT to take selfies.

The press conference transcript is here if you want to read/Google translate it in it’s full entirety (clue, it’s in Russian).


A particular stand out line from the press conference offers a stark warning: “We want to remind citizens that the pursuit of “likes” in social networks can lead to the road of death.”. It’s particularly pertinent given that there have been a number of injuries and deaths resulting from attempted selfies.

Obvious snarky controlling government jibes aside, there is a serious point here: don’t take risks trying to prove how *cool* you are.

We all use social media to a greater or lesser extent to, as one former client put it, ‘microboast’: look at this great view I have; look at this amazing restaurant i’m in; check the wonderful experience i’m having etc.

And that’s fine, it’s what people do. it’s how rationalise the different events we participate in or contribute to – it’s making me a better person.

There’s no point in risking your life for the perfect picture though, is there?

You can download the PDF here.

Four Reasons Community Managers Need to Know Paid Media

The convergence of social media and paid media means that Community Managers must add another string to their ever-growing bow.

Much in the way that using a tool like Radian6, Sysomos or Netbase to understand how a community behaves has become an essential skill, Account Executives right through to Directors, need to know what Paid Media can bring to a communications activity and how to execute.

The emergence of paid media as a communication tool in social media has meant that advertising budgets are being pushed more to the social media realm; recent GroupM research has suggested that this year more than 50% of ad spend will now be put towards digital advertising.

1. Organic reach is dying
The days of thousands and thousands of likes on Facebook posts are over. Facebook have all but ensured that if you want your content to reach the large fanbase you’ve spent the last five years building up, you will need to pay for the pleasure.

It’s easy to hypothesise that Twitter or Instagram will be the next platform to begin throttling organic reach – they need to because…

2. Platforms need to monetise to survive
Getting paid to get people in front of your content is one of the simplest ways to make a quick buck. But it is essential; without platforms there are fewer ways to connect with the switched generation and if the shareholders and investors don’t see a return, they’ll pull the plug.

People do not want to be bombarded by adverts; that means platforms need to make the content they *can* publish work harder.

3.If you don’t do it, someone else will
The landgrab for paid media ownership has been ever-shifting; whether it’s media, advertising, marketing, PR, social media or digital agencies, everyone sees the value that Paid media can bring.

To be able to run and maintain a paid campaign must be a requisite for anyone hoping to succeed in the digital communication space. If you’re unable to do it, someone else will and that means less revenue for your agency and could mean you’re overlooked for that big role you want.

As someone who has managed many different communities over the last eight years, I don’t want to sound the death knell for Community Management, but the reality is that many big brands are pulling that role in-house to dedicated teams. That leaves agency teams with fewer opportunities and a big question: what do we do if one of our main revenue drivers dries up? Become Paid media experts, could be one of the potential answers.

4. You learn about measurement *really* quickly
Social media is converging with direct marketing; what direct marketing is really good at is measuring success.

If you can learn the metrics that make paid media accountable, you’ll learn a valuable analysis skill that can be transferred into different roles and applied across different tasks.

If you are a Community Manager and don’t know how to publish a dark post on Facebook, letalone publish a promoted tweet, now is your time to learn and develop an expertise that will take you out of social media and into marketing.

If you are currently working in the social media space and do not have responsibility for Paid Media on your channels, go and claim it.

#fornicforpromotion Watford Players Tweet Support for Nick Cruwys

Watford players tweeted their support for Nick Cruwys, the Watford supporter who was attacked following the game with Wolverhampton Wanderers, in unison this evening (Friday night) prior to the home match against Reading tomorrow (Saturday).

The team, who have been in the news for sad reasons this week, showed their humility and respect in what has been a tough week for Nick’s family and all those associated with the club.

Having been at the Wolverhampton game and not seen any trouble, it was a shock to read the reports of what happened post-match. It has united, certainly the Football League, if not British football.

Bournemouth fans will show their support on Saturday too, by taking the lead of the 1881, a Watford fan group, and releasing 44 yellow balloons during their game.


As more arrests are made, It shows that the football in Britain can come together, despite rivalries, and that nothing is more important than life itself, not even football.

This is why I love my club.

The Ken Furphy art of Man Management

Ken Furphy, a former Watford manager between 1964-1971, passed away on January 17 this year. He made over 500 appearances for Darlington, Workington and Watford in a career that began at Everton in 1950.

He was seen as a progressive manager, particularly during his time with Watford; so much so that he allowed cameras to record a team meeting that took place prior to an FA Cup tie against reigning European champions Manchester United in 1969.

Watford, in the Third Division at the time, were given little hope against the might of the Red Devils.

Ken Furphy and his team conspired to get a totally unexpected 1-1 draw at Old Trafford. The team were inspired by their manager.

I wanted to share the video of the team meeting because it gives us an insight into how to get the best out of people.

  • Ken puts absolute trust in his players, having the faith in them to go about their job professionally, despite the relative gulf in class.
  • He provides simple, clear information to each player about what’s expected of them.
  • He outlines his player’s strengths and helps them manage where their opponent may have an advantage.
  • He uses positive language to re-affirm his belief in each individual’s ability.

What stands out to you about Ken’s man management style?