More On The Link Economy

Google’s much vaunted tweaking of its search algorithm to help bury content farm-produced materials, seems to have had the desired result, according to CNet.

We compiled approximately 2,000 search terms from a sampling of Google Insights’ Web, news, and shopping searches. We then removed the duplicates, resulting in a total of 1,656 search terms, tested those with Google.com (while not logged in), and compiled the results.

This is particularly key for bloggers who deal in quality of content, rather than quantity.

By producing quality content, you hope it will rise to the top of the pile, aided by links from other blogs and websites. Linking to another site or blog indicates that you think it providing a useful resource that a reader will find informative or helpful.

It’s the digital handshake that links the blogosphere, and as Google takes these handshakes as a sign of quality content, they are all important and hold a certain level of currency-like value.

The New York Times recently took to the paywall route:

[Martin] Nisenhotlz insists that the paywall is an essential first step to better managing the link economy of the Internet for the benefit of all publishers. The ‘web of managed links’ is Nisenhotltz’s vision, a movement where content publishers control how their content is shared so that they don’t simply boost the value of aggregators and new digital platforms.

I believe that this way of managing content will not work unless all content providers follow suit, but then what will a link to their content be worth if a blogger were to link to the content that the majority of their readers would not be able to read without paying?

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